Sometime next week and then the week following I will be reviewing The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls: V. 1, Scripture and Scrolls, V. 2, The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Qumran Community, and V. 3, The Scrolls and Christian Origins edited by James H. Charlesworth. These won’t be book reviews solely, but book reviews in the context of their function as part of Logos Bible Software. In other words, I will be reviewing both content and function.

In order to allow for a more content focused review in those upcoming posts I’ve decided to do a post quickly highlighting why it is beneficial to use Logos when studying the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS). A few weeks ago I reviewed Wise, et al., The Dead Sea Scrolls: A New Translation. As I noted there, I have a physical copy of the book. Unfortunately, it lacks a strong topical index in the print version, so if you are wanting to study something like “spirit” it would take a very long time to move page by page with a highlighter preparing to go back and do a thematic study. When I read this book with Logos I can simply search for a word or phrase and it would show me all the locations where it can be found in the book. Also, I have the Sectarian Texts package (there is also a Biblical Texts package, which I intend to get) so once I’ve searched I can then parallel the translation with the Hebrew text prepared by Martin G. Abegg, Jr., who is one of the translators of the aforementioned book.

What about other DSS related resources though? Well, let me show you why I enjoy reading the volumes edited by Charlesworth on Logos. In the screenshot below you’ll see that several references are mentioned. If I was reading a hard copy of Charlesworth’s book alongside a hardcopy of either a translation of the scrolls or a book with the Hebrew text I would have to spend a lot of time slipping through multiple books to check a reference, but not using Logos since these texts are hyperlinked:

Click the hyperlink and the other book opens to that point.
Click the hyperlink and the other book opens to that point.
Rather than flipping through pages to find CD 7.19-20 it is made available, immediately!
Rather than flipping through pages to find CD 7.19-20 it is made available, immediately.

The two volumes edited by Charlesworth are full of helpful essays from top-notch scholars of the DSS. It helps to be able to keep one’s reading rhythm by quickly checking the reference rather than pausing, putting one book down, picking up another, heading the text, putting that book down, then resuming your reading in the first book.

Also, users of Logos are (or should be) aware that you can highlight your book. I prefer red underlines:

Choose how you want to make marks, underline, highlight, etc.
Choose how you want to make marks, underline, highlight, etc.
Crisp, clean underlines...very different from when I write in my books!
Crisp, clean underlines…very different from when I write in my books!

Next week I’ll take a look at the content of V. 1 and the following week the content of V. 2. Then after that V. 3. If you have any questions about reading books in Logos let me know.

These books were provided for free in exchanged for an unbiased review.

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